Estates


NHS City and Hackney Clinical Commissioning Group is part of the East London Health and Care Partnership (ELHCP), which consists of CCG’s, local authorities and NHS provider Trusts including Homerton Hospital and East London NHS Foundation Trust (ELFT).

The role of the ELHCP is firstly to make sure that local health and care services continue to meet the changing needs of residents and patients, but also to ensure the  most effective use of public funds and that the wider aims of the NHS are met.

The ELHCP Strategic Estates Plan was published in October 2018 and focuses on NHS land and building across the patch, including those in City and Hackney.

The City & Hackney CCG Estates Strategy looks at different types of buildings that provide healthcare services locally, including GP surgeries, hospitals, community hubs/ centres and urgent treatment sites. The primary aims of the strategy are:

    • To develop fit-for-purpose healthcare facilities in the community
    • To invest in primary and social care premises and community spaces to support larger teams of staff from different services and organisations working together
    • Deliver value for money from healthcare estate

At the heart of our local strategy is improving the estates from which health and care services are delivered in the community setting, whilst also improving the hospital setting. We want to make sure that these services are delivered in well-designed and suitably located premises. For example, this may include bringing different community based services under one roof; making the most of space that is not currently used, and ensuring that services are operating in buildings that are fit for purpose.

The ELHCP Strategic Estates Plan and The City and Hackney CCG Estates Strategy will continue to be reviewed over time and updated in line with national directives, commissioning plans as well as engagement with our stakeholders, residents and patients.

Please find below a series of frequently asked questions and answers about City and Hackney primary and community healthcare estates . If you have any further questions, or would like to be involved in the discussions, please contact: CAHCCG.cityandhackneyccg@nhs.net

Please find below a selection of frequently asked questions: 

What is the vision for estates in City and Hackney?

Our vision for City and Hackney estates is:

  • To develop good quality and cost-effective estates infrastructure, which meets the needs of a growing, diverse and relatively transient population
  • To make sure the buildings that are used are fit for purpose and in good condition
  • To develop new and flexible ways to support the delivery of new models of care over the long term
  • To improve the health and care of residents and meet the needs of a growing population with particular focus on those who suffer from health inequalities
  • To ensure care is delivered in a patient centred way by bringing health and care services together where appropriate
  • To enable people to access services closer to their homes

To help achieve the above, our priorities are:

  • To invest in primary care premises to support operating at scale
  • To deliver care through the ‘neighbourhood’ model meaning that we can better meet the specific needs of our population
  • To collaborate with our local partners and providers such as the Local Authorities (London Borough of Hackney and City of London Corporation) and Homerton University Hospital Foundation Trust to ensure that premises are optimised

What is the scope of the City and Hackney CCG Estates Strategy?

This estates strategy covers:

  • Non-clinical NHS estate (premises used for management and administration): at St. Leonard’s Hospital, Hackney Ark and, Kenworthy Road Health Centre (currently leased to the ELHCP Primary Care team)
  • All community healthcare sites: key community sites are St. Leonard’s Hospital, Kenworthy Road Health Centre, and Lower Clapton Healthcare Centre
  • All 40 City & Hackney GP practices

What is the role of the CCG in relation to local NHS Estates?

The community and primary healthcare estates are owned by commercial landlords (including GP-owners), NHS Property Services and Community Health Partnerships. This means that the CCGs and NHS England are responsible for taking a strategic leadership role in estate matters as a consequence of service commissioning.

Although the CCG does not own any NHS estate, nor does it have any capital to invest in estate projects directly, CCGs have a key role in the strategic planning of NHS estate and enabling GPs to develop innovative ways of delivering services. This includes:

  • Working with operational leads to support the transfer of activity out of hospital back into the community and ensuring that there are estates facilities available for these services and that they are fit for purpose.
  • Prioritising primary care and community estates capital requirement in bids to NHS England, as well as working in partnership with other public bodies such as local authorities to progress alternative means of capital investment

What is the CCG’s legal requirement to complete public consultation in relation to Estates matters?

Whilst no direct statute exists that formalises arrangements for Clinical Commissioning Groups or NHS England to consult on specific estates matters, the CCG is bound to engage and consult with the public regarding ‘health care decisions.’

This requirement is outlined within two sections of the NHS Act 2006, later amended by the Health and Social Care Act 2012.

Section 14Z2 of the NHS Act 2006 – public involvement and consultation by CCGs states:

(2) The clinical commissioning group must make arrangements to secure that individuals to whom the services are being or may be provided are involved (whether by being consulted or provided with information or in other ways):

(a) in the planning of the commissioning arrangements by the group

(b) in the development and consideration of proposals by the group for changes in the commissioning arrangements where the  implementation of the proposals    would have an impact on the manner in which the services are delivered to the individuals or the range of health services available to them and

(c) in decisions of the group affecting the operation of the commissioning arrangements where the implementation of the decisions would (if made) have such an impact.

(6) The reference in subsection (2) (b) to the delivery of services is a reference to their delivery at the point when they are received by users.

  • Section 13Q of the NHS Act 2006 – Public involvement and consultation by NHS England states:

(2) The Board [NHS England] must make arrangements to secure that individuals to whom the services are being or may be provided are involved (whether by being consulted or provided with information or in other ways):

(a) in the planning of the commissioning arrangements by the Board [NHS England]

(b) in the development and consideration of proposals by the Board [NHS England] for changes in the commissioning arrangements where the implementation of the proposals would have an impact on the manner in which the services are delivered to the individuals or the range of health services available to them; and

(c) in decisions of the Board [NHS England] affecting the operation of the commissioning arrangements where the implementation of the decisions would (if made) have such an impact.

(3) The reference in subsection (2) (b) to the delivery of services is a reference to their delivery at the point when they are received by users.

These legal duties are set out in an NHS England published paper which outlines and provides guidance on how CCGs and NHS England can meet their obligations (where such obligation exist) relating to the involvement of the public to support  the commissioning of health and care services. https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/patient-and-public-participation-guidance.pdf